Remnants of former Hurricane Pamela head for Texas, Oklahoma

Toppled lamp posts lay on the side of a road after the passing of Hurricane Pamela in Mazatlan, Mexico, Wednesday, Oct. 13, 2021. Pamela made landfall on Mexico's Pacific coast just north of Mazatlan on Wednesday, bringing high winds and rain to the port city.

Pamela moves inland after hitting Mexico’s Pacific coast

MEXICO CITY — Tropical Storm Pamela moved inland over Mexico’s northwest region Wednesday after slamming into the coast just north of Mazatlan earlier in the day as a hurricane.

Pamela made landfall 40 miles (65 kms) north of the port city of Mazatlan, which is also a resort for Mexican tourists.

Civil defense officials in the northern state of Sinaloa said Pamela’s wind and rains caused minor flooding but did little damage in the city.

The U.S. National Hurricane Center said Pamela’s winds had fallen to about 45 mph (75 kph) by midday as it moved inland. It was centered 170 miles (270 kilometers) northeast of Mazatlan and moving northeast at 25 mph (40 kph).

Border residents rejoice as US says it will lift travel ban

SAN DIEGO — Beleaguered business owners and families separated by COVID-19 restrictions rejoiced Wednesday after the U.S. said it will reopen its land borders to nonessential travel next month, ending a 19-month freeze.

Travel across land borders from Canada and Mexico has been largely restricted to workers whose jobs are deemed essential. New rules will allow fully vaccinated foreign nationals to enter the U.S. regardless of the reason starting in early November, when a similar easing of restrictions is set for air travel. By mid-January, even essential travelers seeking to enter the U.S., such as truck drivers, will need to be fully vaccinated.

Shopping malls and big box retailers in U.S. border towns whose parking spaces had been filled by cars with Mexican license plates were hit hard by travel restrictions.

San Diego Mayor Todd Gloria said the economic impact was hard to quantify but can be seen in the sparse presence of shoppers at a high-end outlet mall on the city’s border with Tijuana, Mexico. The decision comes at a critical time ahead of the holiday shopping season.

Energy agency urges bigger global push to cut emissions

FRANKFURT, Germany — The International Energy Agency is urging governments to make stronger commitments to cut greenhouse gas emissions at an upcoming U.N. climate summit, warning the world is not on track to meet environmental goals and that new investment in clean energy was needed to “jolt the energy system onto a new set of rails.”

The Paris-based international organization said Wednesday in its annual world energy outlook that great strides have been made to move away from fossil fuels by relying on more wind and solar energy, while electric vehicles are setting sales records.

Yet the economic rebound from the COVID-19 pandemic also has seen an increase in the use of coal and oil, the report said, as well as a leap in emissions. Burning fossil fuels produces carbon dioxide, the main greenhouse gas that scientists blame for climate change.

“The world’s hugely encouraging clean energy momentum is running up against the stubborn incumbency of fossil fuels in our energy systems,” said Fatih Birol, executive director of the 30-country IEA.

China exports up 28% in September; surplus with US grows

BEIJING — China’s exports rose at a slightly faster pace in September while demand for imports of iron ore and other commodities eased as a property construction boom cooled and authorities enforced curbs on energy use.

Customs data showed exports rose 28.1% to $305.7 billion. That was slightly faster than the 26% increase logged in August, and above economists’ forecasts. Imports rose 17.6% to $240 billion, less than the previous month’s 33% increase.

This year’s trade figures have been distorted by comparison with 2020, when global demand plunged in the first half after governments shut factories and shops to fight the pandemic. Chinese exporters reopened after the ruling Communist Party declared the virus under control in March 2020, while their foreign competitors still were hampered by anti-virus curbs.

“China’s foreign trade performance is leading the field among the world’s major economies, and China has seen an increase in its international market share,” said Li Kuiwen, a spokesman for the customs agency.

“Taking into account the impact of the high base of foreign trade in 2020, the growth rate of imports and exports may fall in the fourth quarter of this year, but the overall upward trend of China’s foreign trade will not change, and rapid growth throughout the year is still expected,” Li said.

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