Use common sense when weighing advice concerning disease pandemic

Public health officials and health care workers everywhere are in the fight of their lives with a viral enemy sweeping the planet.

I didn’t think that Bernie Sanders would emerge as Joe Biden’s chief rival for the Democratic presidential nomination. Yet he outlasted every realistic Democrat except Biden. So, what’s next? Biden will probably be chosen, but can he be elected?

Hoosiers are facing their greatest physical and economic threat since the Great Depression and on the most crucial aspect of this crisis – the availability of coronavirus testing that would allow health and policy executives to learn of the extent of the spread and contact trace those in a cluster – we are flying blind.

This is the third column I’ve written this week. The first two were overcome by fast-changing events. So, I will surrender to the deadline and pen a few words about how to think about COVID-19 over the longer term. This should help us formulate and accept the challenges of the coming months.

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Once the pandemic ends, is it realistic to think that Hauteans, Hoosiers, Americans and earthlings will pick up right where we left off? Ideally, lessons learned from the experience will change lifestyles for the better. Everyone hopes the precautions imposed will have limited the spread and impact of the virus, and health care will improve as a result. Idled workers and businesses, and shell-shocked investors may return to a staggered but wiser U.S. economy. Schools and colleges may become more technologically flexible because of the disruption forcing kids to continue their studies with e-learning digital devices.

The State Legislature, for the most part, made sound decisions during the 2020 session on bills with significant environmental and public health ramifications. But legislators fell short of good public policy in at least two cases.

My wife became ill. It was on a Friday, just after the first coronavirus case was discovered in Indiana. She took our dog outside. The night was cool, but not cold, yet she felt chilled.

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Hoosiers are facing their greatest physical and economic threat since the Great Depression and on the most crucial aspect of this crisis – the availability of coronavirus testing that would allow health and policy executives to learn of the extent of the spread and contact trace those in a cluster – we are flying blind.

This Week's Circulars

Obituaries

GOSHEN [mdash] Esther Nisley, 85, Goshen, died at 8 a.m. Thursday, March 26, 2020, at Courtyard of Goshen. She was born on Sept. 7, 1934, in Goshen, to Cephas and Millie (Hostetler) Nisley. Surviving are sister-in-law, Laura Nisley, Sarasota, Florida, and several nieces and nephews. She was …

SHIPSHEWANA [mdash] William Henry J. Yoder, 83, of Shipshewana, died at 3:15 p.m. Tuesday, March 24, 2020, at his residence, following a battle with cancer. He was born May 13, 1936, in Kokomo, to Joseph and Lydia (Yoder) Yoder. On Feb. 20, 1958, he married Esther P. Miller and she died Dec.…