Goshen News, Goshen, IN

State News

April 21, 2014

Effort under way to restore South Bend gateways

SOUTH BEND, Ind. (AP) — As a boy growing up on the west side, Jerry Niezgodski recalls riding his bike from his home near LaSalle High School, down Lincoln Way West to the Dairy Queen near Lincoln Way and Allen Street.

At the time, Lincoln Way West remained a major commercial corridor in the city. Businesses thrived, and the surrounding neighborhoods benefited. Crime was low, and the scourge of vacant and abndoned housing had not yet become a major problem.

Fifty years later, LaSalle is a high school no more, Dairy Queen is closed and Lincoln Way West is, by most measures, among the most blighted corridors in the city, marked by crumbling streets and sidewalks and large numbers of vacant and abandoned properties.

"You can basically say it went from pretty much the grand entrance to the city to its current state, which is less than ideal," Niezgodski told the South Bend Tribune (http://bit.ly/1i7gCB4 ) of the street, which stretches about two miles from Bendix Drive to LaSalle Street downtown.

But that could be about to change.

In an effort to revitalize both Lincoln Way West and Western Avenue, Mayor Pete Buttigieg last year set aside about $2 million in the current budget to develop a comprehensive master plan for the two corridors.

To oversee the process, the city has assembled an advisory committee consisting of various stakeholders -- residents, business and community leaders, elected officials -- including Niezgodski, who chairs the Lincoln Way West Gateway Association.

"I'm sure there are people who, no matter what this administration or any administration does will be suspicious or question it," Niezgodski said. "But the fact this administration is reaching out to stakeholders of all different backgrounds ... and being logical in its approach to this, stating up front that it will be a multiyear project, with that understanding, I am truly optimistic. It's just a matter of time."

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Three Goshen elementary schools — Chandler, Chamberlain and West Goshen — are providing free meals to all students during the school year as part of the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Community Eligibility Provision of the Healthy Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010. Nearly 80 percent of students at Chandler, 89 percent of students at Chamberlain and 78 percent of students at West Goshen already qualify for free or reduced-price lunches based on their family income. How do you feel about the new lunch program?

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