Goshen News, Goshen, IN

Letters to the Editor

March 27, 2013

More information needed on community center

The Goshen News ran an article titled “Is it time to get out of the pool?” on March 11. I was disappointed to see The News failed to point out that the school corporation is able to move ahead with a new pool without being tied to the community center and without a $35.5 million price tag.

In today’s economy, it is irresponsible to “... look past the overall cost,” as a supporter of the community center project hoped. A community center in Goshen might have a positive impact. Unfortunately, the current proposal is lacking much vital information. There needs to be more disclosure and clear, concrete facts presented before we agree to having our city and school go even further in debt and have our tax burden increased.

Prior to constructing a building at a large cost, it makes sense to have proper due diligence. We need to have multiple financial analysts carefully examine the community center’s capability of being sustainable long term. Many are concerned about the significant introductory price tag, but I am also deeply alarmed by the prospect of the center’s inability to be self-sustaining.

There are several other projects that are just over the horizon that may require taxpayer funding that are necessary for our community, such as the formerly proposed fifth- and sixth-grade school and other pending projects. How does this fit in the overall picture? Those affected by the tax increase have valid questions about the community center. Without the necessary and appropriate information, how can anyone expect the taxpayers to financially support an unknown? Our leaders in D.C. have looked past the overall costs of projects for many years and that has not served our country well. It is time for our community to recognize the difference between luxuries and necessities.

— Steve Warner

Goshen

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Three Goshen elementary schools — Chandler, Chamberlain and West Goshen — are providing free meals to all students during the school year as part of the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Community Eligibility Provision of the Healthy Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010. Nearly 80 percent of students at Chandler, 89 percent of students at Chamberlain and 78 percent of students at West Goshen already qualify for free or reduced-price lunches based on their family income. How do you feel about the new lunch program?

I think it’s a good idea to feed all the students free of charge
I think those who can afford it should pay for their school meals
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