Goshen News, Goshen, IN

Breaking News

July 3, 2013

Impact of Drought of 2012 lingers

INDIANAPOLIS — Last year’s relentless drought and scorching temperatures may seem like a distant nightmare for Hoosiers who suffered through it, but the impact can still seen in places like the Indiana Statehouse lawn, where four of the five towering tulip trees are coming down.

The four dead trees — including one that may be nearly a century old — are casualties of the near-record bone-dry weather that wrecked havoc across the Midwest last year.

But they’re not the only signs of the drought’s lingering impact, following a winter and spring that brought welcome wet relief.

The residual effects range from high prices for livestock feed to dwindling supplies of Christmas trees to an unwelcome boost in the invasive insects like the emerald ash borer.

“It wasn’t the worst drought we’ve ever had,” said Al Shipe, who’s spent 37 years as a hydrologist with the National Weather Service in Indiana. “But it’s the worst one I’ve ever seen.”

At a press conference with state officials early last July, Shipe compared the Drought of 2012 to the Dust Bowl years of the early 1930s. Along with the state fire marshal and the head of the state’s homeland security agency, he urged Hoosiers to stop worrying about the drought killing their lawns and to start worrying wildfires breaking out in fields and forests.

The lack of rainfall in April, May, and June of 2012 — resulting in a 6- to 10-inch rainfall deficit across the state—triggered burn bans in every county as communities cancelled their Fourth of July fireworks displays and imposed mandatory water restrictions. By mid-July 2012, farmers in nearly half of Indiana counties were declared eligible for federal disaster relief because of the toll the drought took on crops and livestock. More would be added before the summer’s end.

The rainfall this year for Goshen in June was 1.34 inches above normal for a total of 5.40 inches.

“It’s a different pattern from last year to this year,” said Courtney Bergfell, meteorologist at the National Weather Bureau station in North Webster. “The area was in a heat wave last year with a high of 103 degrees on July 4. The forecast for (today) is around 80 degrees, about a 25 degree difference.”

The temperature for July 5 last year was 102 degrees and 104 degrees for July 6 and 7.

“It was four days in a row with temperatures over 100, it was a pretty good heat wave,” Bergfell said. “Last year we were in the middle of a drought and there will be a sporadic chance of rain for the holiday weekend. There will be a better chance of showers and thunderstorms in the afternoon. A typical afternoon pop-up showers in the heat of the day. Hopefully, it won’t be a washout.”

For the same period this year: Statewide, temperatures averaged below normal and rainfall was way up – too much in some parts of the state that suffered late spring floods. “We have farmers who lost their corn crop to the drought last year, and this year had their crop washed out,” said Katherine Dutro, of the Indiana Farm Bureau.

Last year, the mercury hit triple digits in the state’s capital city on July 4. This year’s forecast puts the temperatures in the mild 70s.

Another telling indicator of how different this summer is from last year: Requests to the State Fire Marshal’s office from retailers to sell fireworks are up by almost 400 percent, from 243 in 2012 to more than 840 this year.

Also up this year: the number of visitors to the state parks. The drought and heat took a big toll on attendance last summer at the state-owned properties that attract campers, hikers, and other outdoor recreation lovers.

“When it’s too hot to sleep in a tent and you can’t light a campfire, it’s going to have an impact,” said Phil Bloom, spokesman for the Indiana Department of Natural Resources.

The DNR witnessed another effect of the drought: A spike in deer deaths last summer. The lack of rain resulted in stagnant, non-flowing water holes that attracted virus-carrying, biting flies that infected deer with epizootic hemorrhagic disease, known as EHD. In 2011, the EHD virus was detected in only 9 Indiana counties. Last summer, its presence was confirmed in 29 counties and signs of it were reported in another 36 counties.  

Bloom said Mother Nature saw some upside to the drought: When a normally swampy area at Pokagan State Park dried up, park naturalists found a native species, burr marigold, start to blossom for the first time in decades. And when the pesky, invasive Asian carp got caught in some backwaters of the Wabash River, due to the drought, “it made for some good eating for the raccoons,” Bloom said.

The most lasting impact, though, may be to Indiana’s trees.

“It’ll be years before we see all the damage,” said Purdue University forestry expert Lindsay Purcell.

The lack of rainfall put all kinds of trees, including the state’s crop of Christmas trees, under massive stress and made them more vulnerable to damaging insects and viruses, Purcell said. And that means that trees that didn’t die last year are showing signs of dying off this year.  

Hard hit is the state’s official tree: the tulip tree, which Purcell calls “the wimp of the woods” for its inability to withstand drought.

Phil Marshall, a plant pathologist with the DNR, expects to see more dead tulip trees like the ones on the Statehouse lawn. His long-term view: “The tulip tree is dying and will continue to die over the next two to three years,” Marshall said. “Expect to see oak, hickory and maple mortality over the next two to five years.”

Maureen Hayden can be reached at maureen.hayden@indianamediagroup.com

1
Text Only
Breaking News
  • Police cars hit during multi-county chase According to Middlebury police, officer Gary Smith attempted to locate a silver Saturn leaving McDonald’s on Ind. 13, near U.S. 20 in Middlebury at 11:30 p.m. Monday.

    August 19, 2014

  • GN140820 hospital network hacked.jpg Kosciusko Community, Lutheran hospital among 206 hacked

    WARSAW — Community Health Systems, which operates 206 hospitals including Kosciusko Community Hospital and Lutheran Hospital in Fort Wayne, announced Monday that hackers recently broke into its computers and stole data on 4.5 million patients.

    August 18, 2014 1 Photo

  • Rick Perry Indicted [GOSHEN NEWS] Texas' Gov. Perry indicted AUSTIN, Texas — A grand jury indicted Texas Gov. Rick Perry on Friday for abusing the powers of his office by carrying out a threat to veto funding for state prosecutors investigating public corruption — making the possible 2016 presidential hopeful his state's first indicted governor in nearly a century.

    August 15, 2014 1 Photo

  • Rail work to close U.S. 33 Sunday, Monday

    The Indiana Department of Transportation announced that U.S. 33 at Ninth Street, is scheduled to close the morning of Sunday, Aug. 17 as Norfolk Southern rebuilds its railroad crossing. 

    August 13, 2014

  • Obit Robin Williams_Selm.jpg Robin Williams, manic comedy star, dead at 63

    SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Robin Williams, the Academy Award winner and comic supernova whose explosions of pop culture riffs and impressions dazzled audiences for decades and made him a gleamy-eyed laureate for the Information Age, died Monday in an apparent suicide. He was 63.

    August 11, 2014 1 Photo

  • Mideast Israel Palestinians-12 [GOSHEN NEWS] Israel accepts Egypt's Gaza cease-fire proposal CAIRO — Israel and the Hamas militant group on Sunday accepted a renewed Egyptian cease-fire proposal, clearing the way for the resumption of talks on a long-term truce meant to end a month of heavy fighting in the Gaza Strip that has taken nearly 2,000 lives.

    August 10, 2014 1 Photo

  • Mideast Iraq [GOSHEN NEWS] US officials: New round of airstrikes near Irbil NEW DELHI — American officials say the U.S. launched a second round of airstrikes against Islamic State targets near Irbil on Friday, using drones and fighter jets. The officials, speaking on condition of anonymity because they weren't authorized to

    August 8, 2014 1 Photo

  • Millersburg under boil order

    August 5, 2014

  • Concord classrooms will get technology update

    August 4, 2014

  • Name of man found dead in parking lot released

    August 4, 2014

Parade
Magazine

Click HERE to read all your Parade favorites including Hollywood Wire, Celebrity interviews and photo galleries, Food recipes and cooking tips, Games and lots more.
AP Video
Changes Coming to No-Fly List Raw: IDF Footage Said to Show Airstrikes Police: Ferguson More Peaceful Raw: Aftermath of Airstrike in Gaza Raw: Thousands March on Pakistani Parliament Raw: World's Oldest Man Lives in Japan Fire Crews Tame Yosemite Fire Raw: Police Weapon Drawn Near Protesters, Media Raw: Deadly Landslides in Japan Raw: Explosions in Gaza As Airstrikes Resume Arrests Witnessed in Ferguson Charter Schools Alter Post-Katrina Landscape Texas Gov. Perry: Indictment 'a Political Act' US Officials: Video Shows American's Beheading Video Shows Ferguson Cop Months Before Shooting Water Bottles Recalled for Safety Researcher Testing On-Field Concussion Scanners
Poll

Three Goshen elementary schools — Chandler, Chamberlain and West Goshen — are providing free meals to all students during the school year as part of the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Community Eligibility Provision of the Healthy Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010. Nearly 80 percent of students at Chandler, 89 percent of students at Chamberlain and 78 percent of students at West Goshen already qualify for free or reduced-price lunches based on their family income. How do you feel about the new lunch program?

I think it’s a good idea to feed all the students free of charge
I think those who can afford it should pay for their school meals
I think all students should be required to pay for their school meals
     View Results